We love what we do
                                 and it shows!

Beaver Lake Animal Hospital
26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029
(425)557-0752


Beaver Lake Animal Hospital

26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029

(425)557-0752

www.beaverlakeah.com

This page is just to share a few other bits of information about what is up on the property, in Dr. Bennett's life and some pages other links that are just fun.

What's up with the pasture?

If you know Dr. Bennett, you might know for about the last 10 years has limited her veterinary practice to dogs and cats only and that will continue. But it is a shame to have a pasture and to not be using it. We had hired Healing Hooves in 2006 to clean up the pasture.   But around here, of course, things grow rapidly.  So...

 

June 5, 2010 Talasi the llama         and Bud and Buzz the sheep   Bud and Buzz   joined us. 

Some basic information on Talasi is that she is a young adult @ 6 years old (in 2010) and came from a herd of llamas in Monroe.  Talasi's main job is to help protect the sheep from predators.  Talasi has become quite an attraction around here. She is curious and easy going.  She does have her boundaries, for instance she seems to have a rule, 'no pellets, no pets'.  But that isn't too unusual for llamas with Talasi's life and background.  She is a lady and very regal.  She has not spit on or at a person yet, as of Oct 2010.  She came to us already respectful of being haltered and she has allowed us to shear her and trim her feet so far. 

 

Bud and Buzz were born about Sept 2009, so in the picture above they were about 9 months old.  Where is their wool?  Well, they don't have wool, they have hair.  They are a 'hair' breed, not a wool breed, they are St. Croix sheep.  The males grow manes as you'll see in some of the other pics that will be posted.  They will shed in the spring.  Why have hair sheep?  Typically they are raised for meat.  These guys are a bit luckier in that as if they mind their manners they will live a life on this pasture.  If we elect to get some ewes, they will have other duties which they will likely enjoy.

Bud and Buzz have about doubled their size between early June to now, early October.  And they won't be finished growing for a number more months.  I'm not 100% sure how big they will be when they are adults.  They are not very tame and are nervous around people.  They will lean on or sort of wrestle each other and will back up and butt heads together when the mood strikes them.

In September we added to 3 pygmy goats to the pasture.      The pygmys are 3 years old and are being fostered for Puget Sound Goat Rescue. They are looking for a permanent home.  My goal is for them to help control the pasture until a home is found for them.  These little guys are not shy and like people.  They will climb right up onto you if they think you have food.  They are full grown adults.  If you look closely, one was not neutered properly when he was a kid, that is being corrected. He has a shorter and broader stature, has a longer coat and has other features such as longer and thicker horns and a longer beard.  Ironically he is a little more cautious/shy around people but is the boss of the other 2 goats.  The goats will also jump up and come down to butt each other's heads.  Or if in competition for food will use their horns on each other but so far it appears that they are not trying to hurt each other but they definitely use their horns as a form of communication.  The typical expression seems to be 'get out of my way'.

Talasi reigns over all. It took about a week or so for the goats to become one with the other pasture critters but now they spend most of their time in proximity to each other.  Talasi watches over them but seems very comfortable having some distance between herself and the others. Whatever she wants, she gets.  She was alarmed the day the goats arrived but then her curiosity got the best of her and she accepted them.  The sheep continued to be stand-offish for a few more days but Buzz came under the goats spell which helped them all join together. 

It is pleasing to see the critters out in the pasture and they have been a source of regular activity since the plan of restoring the pasture was born this last spring. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are subpages under this main page.  One contains pictures of the visit with the Healing Hooves here.

Another is about our garden.  We first planted it a few years ago and it has grown like crazy.  We share some of the perenial plants if you see something interesting!

Another is about Mazatlan where I've started taking vacation.  There are a lot of pictures there.

Another is a separate web site that is fun.  It is I Do Dog Tricks.  It is quite entertaining.