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(425) 557-0752

Beaver Lake Animal Hospital
26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029
(425)557-0752


Beaver Lake Animal Hospital

26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029

(425)557-0752

www.beaverlakeah.com

No Description

Beaver Lake Animal Hospital

 

Standard Spay/Neuter Procedure

 

A routine Spay or Neuter is done on an animal that is about 6- 8 months old.   The kitten or puppy has not been in heat, and is a normal weight.  The pup or kitten has not had any significant health problems detected.  Both testes have descended into the scrotum on males.

 

On the scheduled morning, you will be asked to sign an authorization form, which also offers other elective services as outlined in the Pre Spay/Neuter Information form. 

 

Once admitted, the pet will have a preanesthesia exam and if a blood lab evaluation has not recently been completed, a few drops of blood will be collected to evaluate organ function, electrolytes and a hematocrit. The heart will be auscultated (listened to) for rate, rhythm and sounds. The lungs will be auscultated.  The mucus membranes will be examined for color and capillary refill time.  The general appearance will be evaluated.  The teeth will be examined for retained deciduous teeth or other dental problems.  Some common problems include early age tartar, impacted teeth, deformed teeth, seriously crowded and under-erupted teeth, malocclusion and supernumerary teeth and should be identified.

Female felines and all dogs initially receive a preanesthesia injection that allows for relaxation, reduces the chance of post anesthesia vomiting and controls excess salivation.   An IV catheter will be placed.  IV fluids will be administered to help maintain blood pressure, provide internal organ support and to help keep your pet from becoming dehydrated.  Anesthesia is induced with an injection of medications that quickly anesthetizes the pet, and allows for intubation.  Intubation is placing a tube through the mouth, between the laryngeal cartilages and into the trachea.  Isoflurane anesthesia is then administered through the tube to maintain anesthesia.  The tube also protects the airways.  Dogs and female cats will be intubated.  Male cats will not have IV catheter, fluids or intubation included in the current estimate but may be included at additional cost.

 

Pain medication will be administered which will help your pet, as needed, before, during and after the procedure.    Medications used vary with the species and procedures.  Some pain medications can increase the sedation of the pet, some will not.

 

The surgery site is clipped and antiseptically prepared for surgery. 

 

For male cats, each sac of the scrotum is incised with a scalpel blade and the testicle is retracted and removed.  The cat is wrapped in a towel then placed in its cage with heat support to recover.  There are no sutures (no stitches).

 

Once dogs and female cats are surgically prepared, they are moved into the surgery suite onto the heated table.  Electrocardiogram leads are attached to allow monitoring of heart rate and rhythm.  They are then connected to the isoflurane anesthesia machine that monitors their respiration, and assists in proper ventilation. The doctor scrubs three times, wears a surgical cap and mask, as well as a sterilely prepared gown and sterile, single use gloves.   A sterile pack of surgical instruments is used along with a new sterile scalpel blade and suture material.  (Although you may think this is standard at all veterinary hospitals, it is not.)

 

An ovariohysterectomy is performed on females.  This is surgical removal of the ovaries and uterus via an incision made just caudal to (behind) the umbilicus (belly button).  The incision is closed in 2 or 3 layers of sutures, depending on the amount of fat on the female?s body.  The final layer is subcutaneous (within the skin).  Sutures will dissolve, and will not need to be removed.

 

An orchidectomy is performed on males.  In dogs, an incision is made just cranial (in front of) to the scrotum.  Each testicle is retracted through the single incision, and surgically removed via an ?open? procedure.  The incision is closed with subcutaneous sutures.  These sutures will not need to be removed.

Pets are recovered in our treatment area on a fleece.  They are extubated after they regain their reflexes and are able to control their airways.  Fluids will continue until the pet seems able to move about.  At that time, they will be returned to their kennel.

 

Heat support will be continued for all small or short haired pets.

 

Pets that vomit after anesthesia will be administered a medication to help prevent further vomiting. (Additional cost)

 

Except for cats that have been declawed, pets will normally be released later the same day at or after 4 PM. Expects pets to seem sedate.  This is to help prevent pain, and allow better initial healing.  Be prepared to allow them to just rest that night.  Do not allow children to handle the pet at all the first night, and for 3-4 days only under your direct supervision.

 

Female pets rarely lick at their suture sites more than just an occasional lick.  However if your female starts to lick much, you must stop her.   Please call for an Elizabethan collar.  If they do lick or chew at the site, they could open up the surgical site to allow abdominal contents to come out which is a life threatening situation.  You must supervise them to prevent them from doing this.

 

An Elizabethan collar is strongly recommended for all male dogs.  These collars help prevent the dog from self-traumatizing and/or infecting their surgery site.  These collars are bulky, and some dogs are somewhat depressed or distressed when wearing them.  You are welcome to develop an alternative.  If your dog is sulking while wearing the collar take it off temporarily, but, only if you can provide no less than 100% supervision during this time.  Your dog should not be allowed to lick or otherwise rub at the surgery site.  This holds true for 4 to 7 days.

 

Be prepared in advance to crate your dog for the first 4 days.   If your pet does not fit in the crate with the Elizabethan collar, you may need to keep your pet in a small room, or keep them on a short tether.  If using either a small room or a tether, your pet will need to be fully supervised to insure safety.

 

Be prepared to confine your female cat for the first 4 days.   We recommend crating her, and you can let her out several times daily to use the litter box while confined in a small room while supervised. You will need to prevent the cat from jumping, running and climbing.

 

After the 4 day crating period your pet should be kept to restricted activity (kept on a 4-6 foot lead and not allowed to jump or run) or crated for 3- 4 more days to allow fastest healing with as little pain and complications as possible.

 

In dogs, you may administer an antihistamine to help reduce the itchiness during the healing, or to help keep your dog sedate if needed.  I recommend Diphenhydramine (generic Benadryl).  The over the counter adult dose is 25 mg size tablets or capsules.  Dogs can be given 1/2 tablet for every 10# of body weight up to 75 mg.  This dose may be repeated every 8 hours if needed.  Reduce the dose if the dog is too sleepy.  You may request a tranquilizer prescription to go home for your pet.

 

Call if you think the pet is in any pain.  DO NOT use any medication not specifically prescribed for your pet.  Do not use ANY over the counter medicines.

 

 

You should briefly check the surgery site once daily.  What to expect: 

For several days to up to 2 weeks, the surgery site may be a little lumpy and firm.  The tissues inside are going through change while healing.  Additionally, the suture materials will eventually be hydrolyzed and absorbed.  For the first 2 days, there may be a little redness to the site however it should be clean and dry.   In some pets with pink skin you may even be able to see the suture under the skin; this is normal.  Usually the suture material does not become exposed.   If you detect any suture material protruding, please call; we will want to check the site for you.  We are happy to recheck the surgery site any time there is a question.

 

With all this said please know we have had very little in hospital or post op complications in our pets.  We just want you to have the information in advance.

(425) 557 0752 

October 2013


BEAVER LAKE ANIMAL HOSPITAL

PRE SPAY/NEUTER INFORMATION

 

Your pet should not have any food or treats after 6 p.m. the night before the procedure.  Water should be available at all times.  Walk your dog before coming into the clinic.  Collect a fecal sample if produced.  Plan on arriving at 8:30 a.m. the morning of the procedure (unless otherwise arranged).  Allow for time to read and sign an authorization form.  You will be given a written estimate of scheduled services. We will call you when your pet is in recovery and the procedures have been completed.

We will perform an organ function test with electrolytes and a hematocrit on your pet on the morning of the procedure.  Our new technology allows us to perform these tests using only about 3 drops of blood.  On some pets, the testing may be completed within the 7 days prior to the scheduled procedure.  An optional complete blood cell count may be performed.

When your pet is in for a scheduled services there are other services that might be of benefit to you and your pet. You may authorize these services when your pet is admitted in the morning, or anytime before your pet is in recovery.  Provided below is information to allow you to make an educated decision.  

1.       If your pet is not yet Microchipped, we recommend this simple injection to permanently identify your pet.

Bottom line, if you want your pet back should they become separated from you, you want your pet microchipped.  Virtually all humane societies and animal control agencies scan pets for microchips.  Most lost pets somehow have lost their collars.  Our Microchips code back to us.  We recommend you also join one or more of the microchip registries so the microchip number will code back directly to you, in addition to us.

  1. We recommend a fecal examination to insure your pet is rid of internal parasites.
  2. We recommend retained baby teeth be extracted if your pet is 6 months old or older.

Retained baby teeth will cause early dental disease if left in.  Typically, if your pet is older than 6 months, these retained teeth are unlikely to fall out on their own after 6 months of age.  Pain medication may be administered if deemed reasonable.  The charge is based on the number and amount of time and supplies required to extract these teeth.

  1. We recommend other dental health issues be addressed if indicated.

We will visually inspect the mouth and teeth.  We will notify you if we find health issues that may impact their dental and/or overall health.   If we find problems we may recommend dental radiographs or treatment. We will visually inspect the mouth and teeth.  If we find missing teeth, they may be truly missing or may have not erupted and may be a hidden problem waiting to happen.  Teeth that do not properly erupt may cause dentigerous cysts which can cause much damage to your pet's mouth.  Similarly numerous other problems can occur which should be corrected sooner than later.

  1. We recommend a touch-up cleaning and polishing and a fluoride treatment for the teeth.

Some 6 month old pups already have tartar on their teeth. We can clean and polish the teeth if needed and  Fluoride can help harden enamel and protect your pet?s teeth maturing teeth.

  1.  We recommend hip and elbow radiographs (X-rays) to check for hip and elbow dysplasia tendency for any pets over 40 #, or expected to be over 40# at maturity.

A hip X-ray is taken with your dog up side down stretched and legs somewhat twisted.  We only do this under sedation or anesthesia.  If your dog's hips look good  great!!   If not, in younger animals, you will have choices of what you can do to prevent or reduce arthritic changes.  In older dogs, we will help you help your pet stay as pain free as possible.

7.       We can complete a urinalysis.

If your dog is still having problems with housetraining or submissive wetting, a urinalysis can help determine if there is an infection or other physical cause for the problem

8.       We can correct umbilical or inguinal hernias.

9.    We recommend the tear ducts be flushed if your pet has epiphora (tear staining).

We can examine the eyelids and tear ducts under magnification.  We can attempt to flush the ducts or open the entrances to the ducts to prevent or reduce epiphora.  Medication may be sent home after this procedure.  The fee is based on the amount of time plus supplies required for this service.

10.  We recommend removing any eyelashes that are disturbing the eyes due to growing in the wrong direction, or place.

Eyelashes growing from the wrong place or in the wrong direction can be epilated.  Medication may be sent home after this procedure

11.  We recommend eyelid corrective surgery if the eyelids roll inwards (entropion) or outwards (ectropion) so as to be disturbing the eye.

If the lids roll in, the hair of the lids rub on the cornea, the eyes are under constant irritation, and corneal ulcers may develop.  If the lids roll out (less common) the eyes may not close properly, nor be able to protect the eye as needed.  The eyes may not be able to be kept moist across the full surface of the cornea, or may collect excessive debris, which cause chronic irritation.

12.  Dogs that will be hunted or worked in the field can have their dewclaws removed.

These claws are more likely to become injured in working dogs.  They can be removed on household dogs also.  Pain medication will be used if the front dewclaws are removed.

  1.  Cats can be declawed.

I have much information for you about the pros and cons and other information pertinent to declawing cats.  Only the front claws are removed.  Pain medication will be used.  Young cats will be kept 2 nights.  Older cats will be kept 2-3 nights.  All my cats were declawed, and kept indoors only.

12.  We can easily perform the following grooming procedures: Toe nail trims,  Brushing or Clipping out mats, Bathing, Expressing anal sacs.  Several of these services are less costly when completed under anesthesia or sedation.

 

(425) 557 0752 

October 2013

Beaver Lake Animal Hospital

 

Post Operative Discharge Instructions

 

 

Pets released the same day will be sedate.  This is to help prevent pain, and allow better initial healing.  Be prepared to allow them to just rest that night.  _____

 

Do not allow children to handle the pet at all the first night, and for 3-4 days only under your direct supervision. ______

 

Pets must be prevented from licking at their surgery site.  ______

 

An Elizabethan collar is strongly recommended for male dogs.  _______

 

Female pets rarely lick at their suture sites more than just an occasional lick.  If your female starts to lick, you must stop her, she will need an Elizabethan collar.  _______

 

These collars help prevent the dog from self-traumatizing and/or infecting their surgery site.  These collars are bulky, and some dogs are somewhat depressed or distressed when wearing them. You are welcome to develop an alternative. If your dog is sulking while wearing the collar take it off temporarily, but, only if you can provide no less than 100% supervision during this time. Your dog should not be allowed to lick or otherwise rub at the surgery site. This holds true for 4 to 7 days post op.

 

Be prepared in advance to crate your dog for the first 4 days.  ______

If your pet does not fit in the crate with the Elizabethan collar, you may need to keep your pet in a small room, or keep them on a short tether. If using either a small room or a tether, your pet will need to be supervised to insure his safety.

 

Be prepared to crate your female cat for the first 4 days.  ______

We recommend crating her, and you can let her out several times daily to use the litter box while confined in a small room while supervised. You will need to completely prevent the cat from jumping, running and climbing.

 

After the 4 day crating period your pet should be kept to restricted activity (kept on a 4-6 foot lead if needed and not allowed to jump or run) for 3-4 days to allow fastest healing with as little pain and complications as possible. _____

 

We want you to call if there are any questions about your pet. _____

 

If your pet has a fentanyl patch, it needs to be brought in for removal within 5 days of application.  Failure to do so increases the risk of a skin infection. _____

 

If your pet has sutures or staples, they should be brought in for removal in _____ days. _____

 

Males may still be fertile for 2 weeks after neuter. Hormones levels also may still be elevated temporarily and may stimulate the pet into sexual activity. Pets must be prevented from sexual activities for 2 weeks after surgery to prevent post operative complications. _____

 

I have reviewed the above information and understand the needs of my pet post operatively.

 

_________________________________     ___________________________________

Name                                                                   Date

_________________________________

Staff Member